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Wild Seed Project: Returning native plants to the Maine landscape

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In Person: Native Seed Sowing Workshop

Viles Arboretum Augusta

Come join Wild Seed Project staff at the Viles Arboretum for an introduction to native seed sowing! In this workshop Emily Baisden will lead a hands-on presentation of all aspects of native seed propagation. The class will begin outside with a walk around Viles Arboretum to identify native plants and demonstrate ecologically-responsible seed collecting, before moving inside to teach seed storing and seed sowing. Be prepared to dig your hands deep into the diversity of native seeds! Participants will go home with two pots sown with native seeds and the inspiration to sow more native seeds in the future. Learn more and register here.

In Person: Seed Sowing Workshop

Hidden Valley Nature Center 131 Egypt Rd, Jefferson

Join the Wild Seed Project staff at the Hidden Valley Nature Center for an introduction to Native Seed Sowing!

In this workshop Emily Baisden, Seed Program Manager at Wild Seed Project, will lead a hands-on presentation of all aspects of native seed propagation. The class will begin outside with a walk around HVNC to identify native plants and demonstrate ecologically-responsible seed collecting, before moving to the barn to teach seed storing and seed sowing.

Be prepared to dig your hands deep into the diversity of native seeds! Participants will go home with two pots sown with native seeds and the inspiration to sow more native seeds in the future. Learn more and register here.

In Person: Seed Sowing at Gilsland Farm

Gilsland Farm 20 Gilsland Farm Rd, Falmouth

In this hands-on workshop, Wild Seed Project & Maine Audubon Staff will introduce native seed propagation for growing your own wildflowers and other plants from seed.

Participants will leave with several pots sown with seeds and ready for maintenance-free outdoor germination.

The class will begin outside with a walk around Gilsland Farm to identify native plants and demonstrate ecologically-responsible seed collecting, before moving to the Education Center to teach seed storing and seed sowing.

Online: Urban Pollinator Corridors

Urban Pollinator Corridors: Creating Native Habitat to Support Pollinators and Other Wild Life
Portland is the largest urban area in Maine and many of the region’s native plants and the fauna that depend on them have been replaced with buildings, paving, and exotic plant species. Creating a vision for restoring native habitat was the goal of the Portland Pollinator Vision Plan, a joint project between Wild Seed Project and the Conway School of Landscape Design. Engaging citizens, grassroots organizations, and public officials to take the bold steps needed when most people can’t even imagine what a habitat corridor would look like requires lots of education and the ability to inspire the multiple actions needed to create connected plantings stretching across the landscape from the healthy wild habitats and farmland of rural areas into the heavily developed city and suburbs. Presented by Heather McCargo. Learn more and register here.

In Person: Seed Sowing at Fields Pond

Fields Pond Audubon Center 216 Fields Pond Rd, Holden
In this hands-on workshop, Maine Audubon Staff will introduce native seed propagation for growing your own wildflowers and other plants from seed. Participants will leave with several pots sown with seeds and ready for maintenance-free outdoor germination.

The class will begin outside with a walk around outside to identify native plants and demonstrate ecologically-responsible seed collecting, before moving to the Visitor Center to teach seed storing and seed sowing.

34th Annual Design Symposium: Landscape, Ecology, and Culture

This New Directions in the American Landscape symposium has a long tradition of celebrating native plants and exploring landscape design at the intersections of ecology, culture, and art. The symposium series deliberately pushes the envelope, offering in-depth explorations of overlooked and forward-looking topics not presented elsewhere and providing practical, concrete information in lieu of trendy jargon. Our programs reflect the diverse factors that shape landscapes and regularly feature designers, ecologists, horticulturists, historians, artists, and anthropologists, among other disciplines. Learn more and register here.

Wild Seed Project’s Anna Fialkoff will give a presentation and be part of a panel discussion on day one at each of the two locations: PA (1/5) and CT (1/12).

Decentralizing Native Seeds: Why and How We Can All Be Native Seed Stewards
A species’ best strategy for adapting to future environmental conditions is genetic variation, and seed propagation maintains the genetic diversity inherent in wild native plants. As we build awareness around the vital importance of native plants and seeds, we are concurrently facing a major gap in supply of this precious resource. Anna will discuss how the Maine-based Wild Seed Project is addressing access to seed and modeling a movement-building strategy by educating and mobilizing neighborhoods, public officials, and other community stakeholders.

In Person: Seed Sowing at Gilsland Farm

Gilsland Farm 20 Gilsland Farm Rd, Falmouth

In this hands-on workshop, Maine Audubon Staff will introduce native seed propagation for growing your own wildflowers and other plants from seed. Participants will leave with several pots sown with seeds and ready for maintenance-free outdoor germination.

The class will begin outside with a walk around Gilsland Farm to identify native plants and demonstrate ecologically-responsible seed collecting, before moving to the Education Center to teach seed storing and seed sowing.

In Person: Winter Walk at Knight’s Pond Preserve

Knight's Pond Preserve 477 Greely Road Extension, Cumberland Center

In this Four Season Walks series, learn how to identify many of the native plants that grow at Knight’s Pond Preserve. Anna Fialkoff, Wild Seed Project’s ecological programs manager, will share about the native wildflowers, ferns, shrubs, and trees and their habitats around the pond, forest, and utility corridor. She’ll also share other fun information on the plants’ uses as edibles, herbals and landscape plantings. Learning to recognize the native species in our midst is the first step toward becoming caring stewards of the places we live, work, and play.

This winter plant walk is the last of the series. With each new seasonal walk you will have an opportunity to see the plants through their full life cycles: from emerging, flowering, and unfurling leaves to fall foliage and fruits, and finally finishing with snow-covered trees and shrubs in winter. For the winter walk, please come prepared for ice and snow.

About Knight’s Pond Preserve:
Tucked among the rolling hills and fields of Cumberland and North Yarmouth, Knight’s Pond Preserve is a natural treasure for many surrounding communities. At approximately 334 acres in size, Knight’s Pond Preserve is a part of one of the largest blocks of undeveloped land in the area, and it contains many natural resource values important to the region, including a 46-acre great pond, forested uplands, a ridgeline with views of Casco Bay, a network of connecting trails, unique natural community types, and critical wildlife habitat. It is a keystone parcel in a multi-town recreational and conservation corridor and has been a conservation priority for the Towns of Cumberland and North Yarmouth for decades. For more information, please visit the Knight’s Pond Preserve listings on the following websites: Chebeague & Cumberland Land Trustthe Town of Cumberland, and the Royal River Conservation Trust.

Online: Diversify Your Lawn

As part of the Hollis Conservation Commission’s Winter Speaker Series, Wild Seed Project’s Anna Fialkoff will present about ways to increase the number and diversity of native plants in yards, parks, and other places where people gather, live, and play. To learn more and register, click here.

In Person: Overwintering Native Seeds

Stone Broke Bread & Book 347 Water Street, Gardiner

Are you curious about what tools we have to build resilient landscapes? Are you excited about sowing native seeds to re-establish diverse ecosystems in the places you live, work, and play? Do you want to know how to build practices of seed collecting, saving, and planting? Are you looking for more information on how to do this, and a place to start?

Join the Wild Seed Project at Stone Broke Bread & Books for a demonstration on how to sow and care for native seeds in the winter. Educational Programs Manager, Nell Houde will walk through the steps of sowing native seeds, where to procure materials, and best practices for ensuring successful germination. There will be Wild Seed Project seeds to buy, lots of time for Q&A and graphics to take home! Come ask questions, get your hands dirty, and plant seeds of resilience.

To learn more about Stone Broke Bread & Book visit their website at https://www.stonebrokebreadandbooks.com/

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