Photographs © Lisa Looke, Heather McCargo
Wild Seed Project: Returning native plants to the Maine landscape
Wild Seed Project works to increase the use of native plants in all landscape settings in order to conserve biodiversity, encourage plant adaption in the face of climate change, safeguard wildlife habitat, and create pollination and migration corridors for insects and birds. A nonprofit organization, we sell seeds of locally grown native plants and educate the public on seed sowing so that a wide range of citizens can participate in increasing native plant populations.

Walks, Talks & Workshops

August 30, b.good restaurant, Portland, Maine
Have a night out at b.good restaurant on Exchange Street! A portion of the proceeds on this night will benefit Wild Seed Project.

September 7, Gilsland Farm Audubon Center, Falmouth, Maine
Join Russ Cohen, wild edibles expert and author of Wild Plants I have Known . . . and Eaten to learn about at least two dozen species of native edible plants.

September 22nd, 23rd, 24th, Common Ground Fair, Unity, Maine
Visit our booth in the Environmental Concerns tent at the fair. Wild edibles expert Russ Cohen will be spending time with us in our booth.

September 28, Mount Agamenticus, York, Maine
Native Plant Walk with Heather McCargo to learn about a diversity of interesting native plants

September 28, Gilsland Farm Audubon Center, Falmouth, Maine
Heather McCargo will present wild plant reproduction and how our landscape practices affect native plants in natural areas and in gardens.

Walks, Talks & Workshops Details »


WSP is looking for a Director of Operations and Development in our Portland office. For details, please visit this information page.

Native Plant Blog

Recommended Reading

tree iconAccounting for Individual Animals in the Anthropocene
August 9, 2017 • By Brandon Keim • Anthropocene Magazine, published by Future Earth

Development’s consequences are not limited to impacts on the environment and biodiversity. The concept of harm should include harm caused to the welfare of individual wild animals.

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